Thursday, December 27, 2007

Enormous fuel cell power plant coming to Milford

Enormous by fuel cell standards, anyways. This 9 megawatt plant is estimated to cost $35 million ($3900/kW) and will be fueled by natural gas. The plant's efficiency is expected to be 60%, about the same as a modern combined cycle natural gas plant (~$600/kW).

While this is considered a huge fuel cell installation, it will provide a relatively small amount of electricity -- about 2% of the capacity of the mid-sized 455MW New Haven Harbor Station power plant.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

Another choice for commercial electric customers

Welcome to the party, Gexa. What is that name, Texan or something?

I'm going to go out on a limb and say that CT customers now have more choices for electricity providers than we have ever had since deregulation. Anyone care to disagree? Check out the list here. I wouldn't really call any of these options "cheap", but at least we have competition. Now get out there and compete!

Oh yeah, don't forget to sign up for our clean options here or here.

Saturday, December 8, 2007

Buy electricity ... on Ebay???



Put in your bid now for 1,000 KW-h of electricity. Current bid is (as of press time) $167, or 16.7 cents per kilowatt-hour. Please not that the UI standard offer is now 12.5. This covers only generation, not distribution, transmission, taxes or any of the other dozen charges on your bill.

Note that they are not selling a "megawatt", as advertised, but a "megawatt-hour". Megawatt is a measure of power and megawatt-hour is energy.

Friday, December 7, 2007

Fueling our Grid


Click the image to enlarge










CTNE
Nuke47%29%
NG30%41%
Coal13%14%
Oil4%5%
Renewables
2%5%
Other (MSW)2%1%
Hydro1%6%

Someone was wondering what fuels are used to produce electricity in our region. Here is the most recent summary based on year-to-date data from the EIA. Actually, power coming on to our grid also comes from sources in NY, Canada and other regions not included in these numbers, but this gives the general idea.

Thursday, December 6, 2007

New choice for electric provider

A Milford, CT company, "Public Power & Utility", is now offering competitive rates to residential and commercial electric customers. They are charging 10.5 cents/KWh compared to UI's current rate of 12.4. Click here to read more about it and click here for a complete list of providers.

Agro school goes solar

Common Ground High School, an agricultural-themed magnet school in New Haven, has launched a new solar energy curriculum. The curriculum will include educating teachers from all over the Connecticut. In conjunction with this, they have had a 2KW PV solar system installed on the premises. Click here to read more.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

Energy investment priorities

I typically try to keep things local here, but I thought this was a pretty interesting graph. Really puts our national priorities into perspective.

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Fight the Hike gets cred from New Haven Board of Aldermen

Fight The Hike, a grass-roots community group dedicated to rolling back recent UI rate hikes, got an endorsement yesterday from the New Haven Board of Aldermen. Read here for more. The board endorsed their call to reduce electricity rates while also investing in more renewable energy.

At the same meeting, apparently in an effort to keep those electric bills from dropping too low, the Board seemed poised to re-commit funding for the city's free electric trolley system.

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Upcoming events

Sorry for the short notice on some of these:

Wed, November 14th @ 6:30 PM
Alchemy Cafe in Hartford
Sierra Club CLEAN ENERGY House Parties across the nation
In an effort to push the Federal energy bill across the finish line the Sierra Club is organizing two national call-in days to Congress--November 9 and 15. They are asking us to host house parties the night before one of the call-in days, on either November 8 or 14. Ask ten friends and neighbors to drop by, watch the "Kilowatt Ours" DVD and make cell-phone calls asking other friends and neighbors to commit to contacting their elected representatives the next day. You'll be provided with the free DVD Kilowatt Ours \ when you sign up to help.
http://www.partylaunch.com/flip/index.cfm
Sat, November 17th @ 7PM
Unitarian Society of Hartford 50 Bloomfield Avenue, Hartford (1/10 mile north from intersection of Rts. 44 & 189)
People's Action for Clean Energy Annual Meeting
"Solutions to an Inconvenient Truth II"
Come meet solar energy installers and environmental exhibitors, and listen to a presentation "Heading Toward Zero Energy Buildings" by renowned solar builder Steven Strong.
Admission is free to the public. Donations are welcome.
Pizza and exhibits between 5 and 7PM, Event 7PM
(860) 693-4813 or www.pace-cleanenergy.org
Sat, November 17th 10AM-4PM
Cornwall Consolidated School Rt 128 and Cream Hill Road
Cornwall Energy Fair
Come for a panel discussion, vendors and exhibitors, an auto show and film festival
Panel Discussion (10:30am-Noon):
Global and Connecticut Warming -Roger Smith, Connecticut Climate Coalition
Home Energy Efficiency -Rebecca Meye Rep., NE Utilities
Green Sustainable Building - Jon Harkness, EBM Services
House Tour (1-4 pm):
Solar and Geothermal Solutions
Kids Program (10:30am-Noon):
Calculate your Ecological Footprint
Film Fest (1-4 pm):
Inconvenient Truth- Al Gore
Al Gore Interview with Charlie Rose
Too Hot Not to Handle-interviews with scientist/innovators
The Warming of Connecticut- Jennifer Boyd

Direct Energy

Another electricity supplier is available to Connecticut residents. Read Luther Turmelle's story in the New Haven Register.

Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Competition drives UP electricity prices


The New York Times has revealed a new study which shows that electricity prices in states with deregulated markets have risen "much more" than those without competitive energy markets. The same data was referenced in a separate study by the Electric Power Supply Association to indicate a 15% price increase (which they labeled "slight") in deregulated states over regulated states. I think to truly compare the effects of deregulation, one would have to somehow take into account other factors such as regional fuel prices, congestion effects and then compare these effects to all states included in the study. That said, I still think the results shown are probably valid.

Sunday, November 4, 2007

Bundle up! Home weatherization assistance available



CL&P, CNG and Yankee Gas are offering to send energy experts out to the homes of qualifying customers to ensure that they are operating efficiently. Free services include:
  • Find and professionally seal drafts, cracks and leaks in your windows and doors
  • Add insulation to your walls and attic, if needed
  • Determine if you qualify for energy-efficient appliance and heating system upgrades
  • Provide and install energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs and table lamps
  • Install water conservation equipment, such as faucet aerators and low-flow shower heads, if needed
  • Provide additional efficiency measures, as needed
Qualification for the program is based on income and the percentage of that income spent on energy (click here for specifics). The program is called WRAP (Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership) and is paid for by the state-mandated "conservation charge" on your electricity bill.

Cold weather is creeping up quickly, so even if you do not qualify for the WRAP program, there may be other options available to you. Browse through the following programs and see if they apply to you.

CT Energy Efficiency Fund

CNG
Yankee Gas
SCG
UI

Saturday, November 3, 2007

Oil accident

Doesn't truck transport just seem like an outdated way to haul energy around? Someday we're going to shock our grandchildren with stories of how we used public highways as a distribution network for deadly, toxic substances. I looked unsuccessfully for some data to compare deaths per BTU due to oil accidents vs. natural gas.

Just my deep, dark thought for the day.

Friday, October 26, 2007

UI & NRG may be peaking together



NRG and UI are teaming up to put some more power into the grid in the form of "peaking plants." UI, which had to sell off all its power plants as a result of energy de-regulation, is now allowed to get back into the generation business thanks to the latest energy legislation.

Activists from New Haven may want dust off the old picket signs and sandwich boards and brace for a battle. Word is that this dynamic duo has their eyes on existing sites and the English Station seems like an ideal piece of property for this purpose. It's got all the necessary infrastructure, it's tied to the grid, and technically it's never been de-commissioned. An organized effort from activists, environmental groups and city officials managed to stave off Quinnipiac Energy's efforts to get this plant restarted a few years ago, but with $700 million burning a hole in their pocket, this team may not go down so easy. (click here to read the DEP's final decision in pdf format)

Still in question is the environmental cleanup that Quinnipiac Energy was paid to perform on the site. No signs of progress, though most of the money (over a million dollars) has already been spent. Click here to a previous posing regarding this issue.

Sunday, October 21, 2007

Town Hall Meeting ... A Conversation on Energy



***UPDATE: Click here to read my coverage of this event in the New Haven Independent****

Quinnipiac University and ConocoPhillips are holding a "Town Hall Meeting" in New Haven this Tuesday and I would strongly encourage anyone else interested in energy matters to attend. It is not every day that we get an opportunity to speak directly with experts from industry, academia and government all at once.

A press release is below and you can find more information a here. Don't forget to register by Monday, 10/22. See you there.

ConocoPhillips believes it's up to today's energy leaders to set the stage for tomorrow's energy solutions, from alternatives like renewable fuels to traditional sources like oil and gas. That's why we're hosting a town hall meeting in New Haven, Connecticut to discuss energy solutions that are reliable, available and environmentally friendly, and we want to hear from you.

Join us for a Town Hall Meeting ... A Conversation on Energy will be hosted by ConocoPhillips and Quinnipiac University and moderated by Mark A. Thompson, dean of the School of Business, Quinnipiac University. Featured panelists for the Conversation on Energy New Haven include:
  • Sig Cornelius, senior vice president, Planning, Strategy & Corporate Affairs, ConocoPhillips
  • Sabrina Watkins, manager, Environmental Technology, ConocoPhillips
  • Eric Brown, associate counsel, Connecticut Business & Industry Association
  • Lise Dondy, president, Connecticut Clean Energy Fund
  • Amey Marrella, deputy commissioner, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Tuesday, October 23, 2007

6:30pm Registration
7:00pm - 8:30pm Town Hall Meeting

Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale
155 Temple Street (
map)

Validated parking provided at Temple Street Parking Garage only. Please show parking ticket at registration table for validation.

Refreshments will be served.

Seating is limited so register to secure your seat by calling toll free to 1-888-877-5917 or logging on to

http://conocophillips.allianceoutreach.com/conversationonenergy/welcome.html.

Registration closes at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, October 22.


Thursday, October 18, 2007

New Haven one step closer to wind turbines

CCEF has approved New Haven's plan for a pilot wind energy program. Now it's up to New Haven's board of aldermen to get things started.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Opposition to big Biodiesel plant in Suffield

There's trouble brewing at a proposed biodiesel manufacturing plant in Suffield. CT Biodiesel is moving to open a 50 million gallon per year plant, which would easily be the largest in CT. However, neighbors don't seem to want a plant in their quiet rural community. While biodiesel itself is very safe and non-toxic, methanol is highly volatile and doesn't have the greatest safety record. Methanol will be used as an catalyzing agent and storing 286,000 gallons on site makes some people uneasy.

Read more about it here:

Residents Cool To Biodiesel Plant Plan
Hartford Courant

Big turnout for meeting on biodiesel plant in Suffield
Journal Inquirer

Biodiesel Plant Doesn't Excite Suffield Residents
Channel 3 Eyewitness News (see video)

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

Biofuels bad for chimps?



This opinion piece in the Waterbury Republican American notes that rain forests are being leveled to grow crops for boifuels. This may be true and certainly a concern. Can't we just avoid feedstocks from these sources? We've managed to build a standard for dolphin-safe tuna, why not monkey-safe biofuels?

Monday, October 8, 2007

Chris Shays embarassed by his own opposition to Broadwater LNG terminal.

Christopher Shays remains opposed to the Broadwater LNG plant, but is being careful not to align himself too closely with certain justifications for the opposition. I suppose it's a little confusing, but really I think he's saying that he wants to make sure that people are opposed for the right reasons.

Wednesday, October 3, 2007

What's a Watt?

Teachers go to energy school, thanks to a program we fund through a small conservation charge on our electric bill.

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Uconn beefing up staff for energy programs




UConn is spending $4 million to hire new faculty for their energy program. They are also looking for a director for the Connecticut Global Fuel Cell Center.

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

Sustainability Forum this Friday

If you have any interest in supporting renewable or sustainable growth in South Central CT, then this is the forum for you!!


Gateway Community College and

the Regional Growth Partnership

invite you to a



Regional Sustainability Forum

The Sustainable Economy:

South Central Connecticut’s Green Future”



Friday, September 21, 8:00-10:00am

Gateway Community College

North Haven Campus

88 Bassett Road



The Forum is an opportunity for all those involved in sustainable industries in South Central Connecticut to help formulate a regional strategy for promoting the growth of these industries as part of the region’s new Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy.


  • Help identify the needs and priorities of sustainable industries

  • Identify needed public investments and policy changes

  • Identify opportunities for growth and new business

  • Network with others involved in sustainable industries



You should attend if you are engaged in:


  • Renewable Energy

  • Alternative Transportation

  • Green Building

  • Environmental Services

  • Clean Energy Development



PLUS, the forum will include a panel with State Representative Steven Fontana, Bill Leahy from the Institute for Sustainable Energy and Erik Robie from UTC Power who will share their insights into the current state of Connecticut’s sustainable industries. Dr. David Cooper will also speak about Gateway’s “Center for a Sustainable Future” initiative to train the workforce needed for the new sustainable economy.


For more information or to RSVP, contact Peter Stein at (203) 782-4389 or pstein@rgp-ct.org.

Thursday, September 13, 2007

CT gets kudos for efficient homes


The EPA has commended CT for leading the country in the building of energy efficient homes. Energy Star homes are said to be 20-30 percent more energy efficient than standard homes. Connecticut, with 23% of new homes built to this standard, is second only to Vermont with 24%.

Friday, August 31, 2007

Paint fumes into energy

Torrington's FuelCell Energy will increase production by the end of this year by more than double. Part of this anticipated demand comes from Ford Motor Company's move to capture fumes from their painting facilities and turn them into energy.

Thursday, August 16, 2007

ConocoPhillips asks CT residents to speak up about energy

(Update 8/20/07) Due to hurricane activity in the Gulf of Mexico, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL 10/23/07. Click here for more info.

********
ConocoPhillips is holding a series of community meetings across the US. New Haven's will be this coming Tuesday, Aug 21, at 7PM in the Omni Hotel.

From the ConocoPhillips website, "...the company will engage area residents and energy users, and local community and business leaders, to discuss energy solutions that are reliable, available and environmentally friendly. Local citizens are invited to ask questions and offer suggestions, while discussing supply/demand issues and energy alternatives with industry experts. "

New Haven's panel of speakers wilThe panel of speakers will include :
  • Bob Ridge, ConocoPhillips’ vice president of health, safety and environment
  • Sabrina Watkins, the energy company’s manager of environmental technology, ConocoPhillips
  • Eric Brown, associate counsel for the Connecticut Business & Industry Association
  • John A. Mengacci, undersecretary with the state Office of Policy & Management’s Energy Policy Unit
  • Robert B. Wall, director of energy market initiatives for the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund.
Don't forget to RSVP if you plan to attend. Click here to read some of ConocoPhillips' responses to selected questions from the community.

Saturday, August 11, 2007

The Rebound Effect

Someone recently suggested to me that by conserving energy and boosting efficiency, we are likely to lower prices to the point that we will end up using more energy resources than we do now. This is actually an extreme condition of a well-known phenomena called the "rebound effect". The concept is that if we increase efficiency by 50%, we will not see a 50% reduction in fuel consumption because people will tend to use more (rebound). Jevons Paradox goes further to say that final consumption could actually be higher than initial consumption in some cases.

Here is a table of typical rebound effects for different markets.


The theory that boosting energy efficiency will inevitably end up increasing energy demand is, in my opinion, unrealistic. One reason is that energy markets are much more complicated than simple supply/demand. Some energy markets seem largely unaffected by cost -- people continue to use what they want regardless of the cost. For example, if our cars could get twice as many miles per gallon, would we really drive twice as much as we do now? There aren't enough hours in a day. Conversely, when gas prices doubled recently, did people use half as much fuel? Of course not, we kept buying more and more and just lived without other less necessary things (food, clothing, etc.).




The graphs above show the effect that gasoline prices have on fuel consumption. Doesn't seem to really make any difference what it costs -- we just keep buying more. Cost is normalized to 2006 dollars and all data comes from EIA. I'll post some electricity graphs in a bit, but they show the same story.

Friday, August 10, 2007

Perspective on electricity rates

USA Today, America's comic-book newspaper, published this report looking at electricity prices in "de-regulated" states compared to "regulated" states. While CT is clearly near the top of the stack (2006 figures), it is not the highest in rates or percentage increase -- a claim I have heard frequently. USA doesn't mention whether taxes or rapayer-funded programs are included in these figures.

New CT Innovations chair

Edward Bowman, a former Cheshire town councilman, is stepping away from building a biodiesel facility so that he can serve as chairman of Connecticut Innovations. The appointment has garnered some criticism as Mr. Bowman does not appear to have a background in technology innovation. On the other hand, sometimes it takes an outsider to stir things up.

Connecticut Innovations was set up by the state legislature almost two decades ago and for the last decade has been running on returns from its investments, largely in pharmaceutical and biomedical start-ups. In addition to these investments, CI also administers the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund, which is fueled by money from our electricity bills.

Wednesday, August 8, 2007

Business New Haven Interview


Business New Haven interviewed me about this blog and my thoughts on renewable energy. I am very pleased with the results, though I wish there was room to expand some of the answers. I am curious to hear feedback.

Also, click here for an interview with Roger Smith of Clean Water Action.

Tuesday, August 7, 2007

Efficient home for the holidays

If you've been considering buying an energy-efficient appliance, now is the time to pull out your wallet. CT has enacted a sales tax holiday through Sept 30th on these items.

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

Gasoline is an "alternative fuel"????



Rosa DeLauro has submitted a bill that would allow gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles to qualify as "alternative fuel vehicles". This would allow states to meet federally mandated fleet requirements by purchasing hybrids instead of CNG or flex-fuel vehicles. She points out that drivers of "flex-fuel" vehicles only choose to fuel up with ethanol about 3 percent of the time, using gasoline the rest of the time.

Though I recognize the dilemma here, this proposal clearly offers no solution. Hybrids run on gasoline, which cannot considered an "alternative" by any stretch of the imagination. If we include hybrids then why not turbo-diesels, which can provide higher fuel economy than some hybrids?

The fleet requirements are not intended to address simple fuel economy, they are intended to create a market and infrastructure for use of alternative fuels. If the government wants to promote alternatives, it is not going change much by simply re-labeling gasoline as an alternative fuel. A more sensible solution would be to bring more ethanol and biodiesel fueling pumps into the state.

Renewable Energy Assoc. of CT.

A Trumbull-based biofuels consulting firm has announced the birth of the Renewable Energy Association of Connecticut. REAC is looking for charter organizations, primarily those involved with developing solar, wind and biofuel. Click here and here for more info.

Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Solar Divinity

There was a dedication yesterday for a 40KW solar system installed at the Yale Divinity School. You can check this website to see how much power this installation is generating throughout the day in real time. Yale went double-dutch and split the bill with us.

Chicken power



"Chicken Manure and tree-trimmings" will be the main ingredients for this proposed 30MW concoction. It is one of 11 projects endorsed by CCEF and awaiting approval by the DPUC.

Another naysayer has claimed that it is unfeasible to replace current energy demands with renewable sources. Hogwash. Thankfully, the author covers both sides of the story with equal attention.

Thursday, July 19, 2007

NRG joins climate action group

NRG, which owns some of the dirtiest power plants in Connecticut, announced that it is joining the call for federal limits for greenhouse gases.

Friday, July 13, 2007

Coming and going

Looks like Hamden may be saying hello to a fuel cell system, providing clean electricity and heat for the pool. Funding to be provided by me and you through CCEF.

CT is considered the fuel cell capital of the US, but we may be losing one of our heavy hitters. Proton Energy, which has the rare distinction of actually producing a profit-generating fuel cell product, is up on the bidding block.

Thursday, July 12, 2007

One Thing


I was pleased to see that Governor Rell is replacing all the incandescents in the Gov's Mansion with CFLs, but kind of surprised that is wasn't done years ago. I can't stress enough what a simple and effective means of conserving energy this is. I bought a new home recently and it took me a month or two to replace the bulbs, but my electricity bill shot down by 32%. Click here to see why they are a no-brainer.

The Gov was kicking off the "One Thing" energy efficiency campaign and also recommended smart energy practices like buying local foods and washing clothes in cold water.

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Spring Break...Bridgeport?

According to Lisa Dondy of the CCEF, "Bridgeport has more sunny days than Miami...". I'm not so sure where she got that data, but NREL finds that the Bridgeport sun averages about 15% less radiation than the Miami sun (Wh/m^2/day). Not too shabby.

Thursday, June 28, 2007

Spanish Gas



According to this article in the New Haven Register, a Spanish company is all set to scoop up the parent company of two major Connecticut Natural Gas Utilities -- Energy East (owner of SCG and CNG). This will put them at the helm of over 3 million customers across New England and New York, including roughly 300,000 in CT. They say they will focus on improving infrastructure. The deal awaits approval from FERC, state agencies and shareholders.

Wednesday, June 20, 2007

Ansonia looks to create micro-grid

As a result of CT's new energy legislation, Ansonia is now planning to build its own li'l electric grid to sell municipal power to industrial customers. They figure that the "inter-city micro-grid" will pay itself back within 1.5 years and they will be able to supply more reliable power at a lower cost than existing suppliers. They anticipate building up to 1,000 KW of capacity, which is not a tremendous amount but a significant start. To give a rough idea of scale, this might generate enough power for 4 or 5 large supermarkets (demand fluctuates widely for industrial and commercial uses depending on the specific function).

Friday, June 15, 2007

GE Solar Installation

CCEF has awarded a $722,000 grant to General Electric (#7 on the Fortune 500 list) so that they can install their own solar panels on their corporate headquarters in Fairfield. The 168KW system is to be a demonstration unit to encourage other companies to follow the same path.
Asked why a large, profitable corporation like GE would need financial help from the state, O'Toole said one reason "is to show you have to invest in new technologies. Companies cannot do it alone."
Yes, that's $722,000 of public funding for GE to show the world that their solar panels are not economically viable. I'm not really feeling this one.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

CT #1 in Efficiency!!

At least according to the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy we are. This organization has ranked CT #1 in its State Efficiency Scorecard. Well, actually we're tied for first place with VT and California, but we can still say we're #1! The ranking does not necessarily mean that we are the most energy efficient state, just that they feel we have the best policies. Here are the criteria they used:
1. Spending on Utility and Public Benefits Energy Efficiency Programs
2. Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)
3. Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
4. Building Energy Codes
5. Transportation Policies
6. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards
7. Tax Incentives
8. State Lead by Example and Research & Development
I wonder if we will break the ties once the new energy bill is enacted.

Tuesday, June 5, 2007

Energy Bill Signed



WTNH is reporting that the Energy & Efficiency Bill has been signed into law...well, most of it. Rell vetoed two sections of the bill which she said put us over our spending cap. Interesting, because it's not really clear that she has the power to use a line item veto.

The sections she struck out are unfortunate. One was supposed to replenish the Conservation & Load Management Fund and Clean Energy Fund, which had been raided to pay for other costs (like electric bills for state buildings, etc). The Conservation fund is especially important because it supports efficiency improvements that might not be otherwise affordable in the short term and often pay back within a few years. Maybe even more importantly, the C&LM fund helped reduce peak loading significantly (almost 100 MW in 2002 alone). As we know, providing power in peak summer hours is particularly scary this year as transmission congestion may very well lead to blackouts. We all pitched in to these funds but then the money was diverted for other purposes. It seems right that they should be replenished.

Monday, June 4, 2007

More meat in the Energy & Efficiency Bill



I've been browsing over a summary of the pending energy bill and I would say there is quite a bit more meat in there than I had realized. In my last post I had said that we would be better served by an electric industry that did not increase profits with increased electricity usage. That's exactly what the legislature has proposed:

§ 107 — DECOUPLING
The bill requires DPUC, in rate cases that begin after the bill's passage, to order electric and gas companies to decouple their distribution revenues from the volume of sales. It can do this by a sales adjustment clause, rate changes that increase the amount of revenues recovered through fixed distribution charges, a mechanism that adjusts actual distribution revenues to reflect allowed revenues, or a combination of these measures. In making its choice, DPUC must consider the impact of such “decoupling” and the rate of return the company earns on its equity and make necessary adjustments.


I must say I am definitely feeling a bit better about this energy bill. Some other measures worth noting:
Rebates for energy efficient heating equip. installations
Mandatory property tax exemptions for renewable installations
New buildings over $5 million must meet LEED silver standard
Restoring previously-raided funds to Conservation & Clean Energy funds
Real-time pricing options for all customers

Sunday, June 3, 2007

Back In Business

Looks like UI and CL&P are going to be back in the business of generating electricity. Nobody seems very confident that this will help reduce electricity rates. So why are they passing the bill? I think Mr. Looney sums up the reasoning quite nicely:
"It's a difficult process because of its complexity," said Senate Majority Leader Martin M. Looney, D-New Haven. He said the multitude of provisions in the 165-page bill were "discussed in sometimes agonizing detail."
In other words its a long bill that they don't understand and don't really enjoy hearing explained.

Actually, the way the bill is set up it may provide some relief over the next few years. The utilities will be allowed to build and operate their own peaking plants. They will operate (in theory) only during times of highest demand, when open market electricity prices shoot through the roof.

The bill does have some other provisions, such as varying rates based on the time of day power is used and offering tax breaks for energy-efficient appliances. I believe it also includes new efficiency standards for appliances, though I haven't seen the details yet. This is a much-needed change, but I think it is more suited for federal control, as we will likely only limit the number of available models (manufacturers will not make CT-only washing machines).

I think a real overhaul would somehow restructure the whole industry such that energy companies' profits do not depend so much on KWh sold. Right now everyone is just trying to sell more and more product and this really works against conservation. Any conservation initiatives are mandated by the gov't and paid by me and you through extra charges (per KWh) on our electric bills.

Thursday, May 31, 2007

Gasoline tax giveaway approved Senate

Great, now our state Senate wants to help people burn more gasoline. This is a cheap trick to win over votes and it is completely transparent. How about encouraging people to reduce consumption? That wouldn't cost us $124 million. If we have room in the budget for tax cuts, certainly we can find better places to make those cuts.

Lobbying for power



Lobbyists are working overtime to get a word in for their clients in the energy industry. According to this article in the Hartford Courant, energy companies have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars over the last few months to influence our representatives' decisions on this multi-billion dollar industry. The biggest push seems to be from NU (parent company of CL&P), who is asking for permission to get back into the power-production business. Separating generation services from transmission and distribution was at the heart of CT's 1998 deregulation legislation. This would essentially reverse that, at least to some degree, and put more power back into the hands of the utilities.

Wednesday, May 30, 2007

The Windy Elm City


The city of New Haven is looking into installing some wind turbines, but first will be a CCEF-funded pilot project to gauge feasibility. Mayor Destefano and his policy analyist, Emily Byrne, explain the concept in this article in the New Haven Independent. I think this is a fine idea and an ideal use for the renewable energy fund that we all pitch into from our electric bill.

In the comment section below the article, Tom Gray of the American Wind Energy Association brings attention to a bill working its way through the US legislature that appears to prove a major stumbling block for small distributed wind turbines. This deserves further attention, but at first glance certainly appears to be an unnecessary disruption in the fastest growing renewable power source in the US.

Wednesday, May 16, 2007

Look out for blackouts this summer


Southwest CT is apparently one of the top three most likely regions in North America to face blackouts this summer.
The flow there is so constrained that it is the only area in the country where, in essence, there is not enough energy if consumers crank up air conditioning and other appliances at the potential summer peak.
This is not good news but hardly surprising. But don't start getting soft on new plant regulations just yet. The problem is not lack of generation capacity -- it's bottlenecks in the transmission system. We have enough power, we just can't always get it where it needs to be.

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

New Hydro coming to CT



The Connecticut Clean Energy Fund announced that it has approved a loan for a 500kW hydroelectric plant at the Kirby Mill within Mansfield Hollow State Park. Hydroelectric is by far the most widely developed renewable source, providing almost 7% of the nation's electricity. Hydro isn't perfect (nothing is) but when installed responsibly to minimize social and environmental impact, it's hard to beat. It has been shown that hydro plants with large reservoirs actually generate significant greenhouse gas emissions, as large areas of vegetation decompose under the new lake and release methane gas. This plant looks to be a run-of-the-river type, which does not require a large reservoir and will include a fish ladder so as not to...um, bother all the fishies, I guess.

This project sounds to me like an excellent investment -- by the way this is your money they're dishing out, so pay attention. If this is the entire funding (the press release isn't too clear), then the installation comes to about $1000/kW. This is quite a bargain considering they've been funding fuel cell installations like they're going out of style at about $4500/kW. The neat thing this about this project is that the developer of the turbine, Windham Automated Machines, operates from inside the very mill where it will be installed. Compared to their pizza sauce dispenser, this must be a pretty exciting product for their engineers to work on.

Thursday, May 10, 2007

Gas price perspective



This article in the Hartford Courant does a decent job of putting gas prices in perspective.
If it's any consolation, the country has not yet reached an all-time high in the average cost of gasoline. That occurred in 1981, when gas would have cost $3.22 per gallon in inflation-adjusted dollars, according to the Energy Information Administration..
The graph above shows not the peaks, but the inflation-adjusted annual averages over almost 100 years. Things really don't look so desperate from that perspective, though over the last 5 years we have certainly seen a big jump regardless of how you figure the numbers. I think your average consumer is going to see the sudden jumps but not the long declines -- when gas is relatively stable (nominal dollar amount) but the cost of everything else increases around it. Either way, it's encouraging to hear things like this:
MacDonough, a landscaper, says he changed vehicles when prices rose above $3 a gallon. He has a pickup truck, but now he only uses it for work. The rest of the time he drives a Mercedes he's borrowing from his mother.

Wednesday, May 9, 2007

If you don't like it -- don't buy it!!

Sorry if I sound grumpy, but I really get tired of everyone whining about gas prices. Why can't we just stop horsing around with complicated "zoning" prices and wholesale tax caps and just let the whole supply and demand thing balance it out? Keep the taxes high to discourage people from using so much. In your morning commute, count how many cars have more than one occupant and then tell me that there isn't room to conserve more. Why do we "need" relief?

Sunday, May 6, 2007

Broadwater Band Aid


In an editorial today, the New Haven Register has come clean with its support for the Broadwater LNG terminal to be built out in the Long Island Sound. Even if you look beyond the concerns about safety, industrialization of the Sound, visual blemishes in the skyline etc., does anyone ever stop to consider that this whole project is a shortsighted band-aid to a much bigger issue? We use too much electricity. Hellooooo. Instead of continually breaking our backs to feed the addiction, how about focusing on reducing demand. It's not difficult or expensive and we don't even have to change our lifestyles.

Europeans use half the energy that Americans use. I'm not talking about backwoods third world countries -- these are industrialized nations that in many respects enjoy a higher quality of life than we do. The hoops we jump through to feed the monkey are mind-boggling. Start with CFLs. Shut off the AC -- this is Connecticut, not Florida. Hang your laundry out to dry in the summer. Turn off your 60" television for a while and play your ukulele. Demand that the legislature tighten efficiency standards in building codes and appliances sold in the state. These are simple, common sense measures that will save us all money in the long run.

Instead of choosing the smart and cheap way out, we consistently choose the expensive and destructive path that leaves us really no better off the long run.

Saturday, May 5, 2007

Decisions, decisions


I dozed off for a minute and when I woke up... I found out we now have FOUR choices for energy providers in UI's district! Stamford, CT-based MXenergy joins Levco (subdivision of Northeast Utilities), Conn Ed, and Constellation New Energy in the marketplace...oh yeah, you still have the standard offer if these guys aren't good enough so I guess that really makes 5 choices. I tried to check MXenergy for rates, but it doesn't seem like they're really ready to take on customers. I had to fill out a form and they will let me know when they are servicing my district. I will note once again that until the rates went up residential customers had exactly ZERO alternatives in this district, bolstering my argument that the artificially low standard offer stifled competition against the utility monopolies.

Friday, May 4, 2007

Boycott gas boycotts


Every year I inevitably get an email from someone asking me to participate in a one-day gasoline boycott. Mind you, this is not a solicitation to stop using gas -- just to postpone buying it for one day. The email claims that prices will drop overnight. The only possible harm you could do to the gasoline industry is take a day's pay out of the pocket of your local gas station proprietor. The gas distribution companies drop fuel off every week or so -- they don't care what day you buy it on. The big oil companies that trade millions of barrels care even less. How about not driving for a day, or even better a whole week? Feel free to ignore those boycott solicitations or better yet, when you get one think of riding your bike to work that day.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Presentation -- Energy & Environment Markets

This May 9 presentation in Stamford looks well worth the admission price (free). Representatives from the DPUC and the DEP discuss the "increasingly intertwined" topics of energy and the environment. I would say more like "tangled". Presented by SoundWaters.
Topic: Energy & Environmental Markets - Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and CT's Renewable Portfolio Standards
Date:Wednesday, May 9, 2007
Reservations by Thursday, May 3
Time:5:30-6:30 pm
Reception 6:30-7:30 pm
Presentation/Question & AnswerLocation: UBS, 677 Washington Blvd. Stamford
No walk-ins will be permitted.Registration for this event is required.
Please email soundbusiness@soundwaters.org or call 203-406- 3319 by Thursday, May 3, to reserve your place.
I did note that they give directions by train! Last time I went to a DEP presentation I had to find a train map and overlay it with the auto directions they provided. Who drives to Stamford, anyways?

Thursday, April 19, 2007

Stamford attempts to takes charge of it's electricity needs



Smack dab in the middle of one of the most congested corners of the US electric grid (if not THE most congested), Stamford is considering taking matters into its own hands. This article from the Stamford Times makes a compelling case for distributed generation. Instead of relying on an aged and teetering transmission grid, Stamford (or parts of it) would generate its own power from clean local sources. This would be a very smart move and hopefully other population centers will follow suit.

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

CL&P seeks another rate incr...wait, does that say reduction?!

CL&P, recognizing reduced congestion charges and favorable new power purchasing contracts, is asking the DPUC for permission to lower rates by 5.5% for residential customers. Sorry commercial customers, your rates are still climbing -- this time up by 1.4%.

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

A lump of coal for Big Power



Many coal plants, including some in Connecticut, were grandfathered after the passage of the Clean Air Act so that they did not have to meet modern pollution standards. However, when operators made a "modification" to these plants, they would theoretically have to bring them up to code. Depending on who has been sitting in the White House, the term "modification" has been taken to mean different things and many of these plants are still billowing sooty smoke and poison into the air (though in CT we managed to pass our own emission standards). The Supreme Court recently ruled 9-0 that a lower court unjustly allowed these plants to bypass the Clean Air Act with loose definitions of "modification".

What this will do, in my estimation, is level the playing field a bit. In an open market, dirty plants that have not installed pollution control technology have been cheaper to operate and therefore economically preferable to cleaner modern plants.

In a similar Supreme Court decision, it has been decided that CO2 is a pollutant and the EPA has the authority to regulate its emission. We will see where this leads.

Saturday, April 14, 2007

Fuel Cell bus in service in CT



A few years back I got to drive one of the fuel cell SUV projects that I worked on, but I didn't exactly live out my Dukes of Hazard fantasies when I learned that I was driving a $6 million car. Apparently this bus cost only half of that -- not a bad drop over 4 years but still quite a ways to go before these can be taken seriously. If fares are proportional to vehicle cost, they're going to have to jack it up to $50 a ride.

Monday, April 9, 2007

Biofuel infrastructure...what's the problem?

Ray Hackett's column in the Norwich Bulletin claims that:
"There are better sources for biofuels, but the bigger problem is we lack the infrastructure to distribute it."
I agree that corn is probably a poor feedstock in the long term, but I don't see where the perceived problem with infrastructure comes from. As far as I know, it can be distributed with the same oil trucks tanks we use today. There may be some material compatibility issues in some cases (long-term storage, for example), but this is not an issue with the low blends that today's market calls for. This is not the same level of difficulty as, say, a Hydrogen distribution infrastructure would entail.

Keep your icky oil out of our Sound...but can you fill up the tanks before you leave?



When an oil tanker delivers its bounty, it needs to take in seawater to replace the weight of the unloaded oil. This seawater mixes with residual oil in the tank and eventually gets jetisoned when the tanker is ready to refill. That makes a mess, but hey -- that's part of the price we pay for using oil. Now, I don't know exactly what happened with this here tanker, but I hope they weren't putting that gooky mess into our sound. Tsk, tsk. Thanks again, New Haven Independent.

Wednesday, April 4, 2007

Aussies and Farmers



Well folks, I'm up to my neck in boxes but I finally got my internet connection up and running so I should be able to get back to business very soon.

US Sustainable Energy Corp. has partnered with the Central Connecticut Cooperative Farmer's Association to produce a "carbon-based" fertilizer to replace typical fossil fuel fertilizers. One of the downsides of crop-based fuels is, like with any large-scale agricultural process, we still use a large amount of fossil fuels to grow plants. Here's the article.

The Australian gives props to Yale for committing to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 43% by 2020. Where Yale came up with that goal we may never know (why not 40% or 50%? did Harvard commit to 42%?). What this article shows to me is the value of encouraging high-profile institutions to embrace responsible energy practices. While the actions of one university alone can scarcely make a dribble in the bucket, the world is obviously watching and they very well may inspire Australian institutions to follow suit.

(BTW, that really is me in front of the Sidney Opera House.)

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Mott jumps into fuel cells



Mott Corporation in Farmington, CT is a familiar name to any manufacturer who utilizes porous metal products -- typically for high purity or high temperature filtration applications. They recently recieved an SBIR grant to develop fuel cell membranes. Fuel cell "stack" plates require high surface area within a small volume, which is a great application for sintered metal plates like the ones Mott produces. In simple terms, they take metal powder or grain and heat it up so they are just hot enough to bond together, but not quite hot enough to melt into a pool. Look for them in a fuel cell near you.

Tick...tick...tick..

Still waiting on some meaningful energy policy to materialize. The Boston Globe reports:

Earlier this year, House Speaker James Amann, D-Milford, said he expected a package of reforms aimed at addressing Connecticut's energy woes within the first 30 days of this year's legislative session. But the two leaders of the energy committee are still trying to craft a compromise bill to present to the full legislature.

This session ends June 6.

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Live wire!! State Rep joins energy forum tonight

Don't miss this "live-blog" discussion with State Rep Kim Fawcett -- tonight at 8PM on MyLeftNutmeg.

Green Energy Conference in Clinton



This sounds like an exciting conference in Clinton organized by the Shoreline League of Democratic Women. The focus is on environment, energy use and conservation.
Speakers include Mark Simon of Centerbrook Architects and Planners; Bob Chew of SolarWrights; Alice Liddell and Derek Murrow, policy analysts from Environment Northeast; Keri Enright from SmartPower; and Rep. Vicki Nardello of the legislature's Energy and Technology Committee.
I suppose un-democratic men would probably not be turned away. Show up to the Clinton Town Hall on April 19th to find out.
For more info information on the Shoreline League of Democratic Women, send an e-mail to sldworg@gmail.com or contact Belinda Jones at 860-399-1147 or Laurie Santos at 860-669-8395

New biofuel facility in Cheshire announced

Councilman Tim White is excited about a new biofuel facility to be built in Cheshire. And who wouldn't be? The bio-fuel industry grew about 300% last year and shows no signs of stopping. The New Haven Register article implies that they will be simply mixing vegetable oil with diesel fuel, but I doubt that is the case. Normally the oil is processed into biodiesel (by extracting gycerine) so that it becomes a more homogenous mixture.

Sunday, March 18, 2007

DIY Green energy systems



Ever look at a big wind turbine and think to yourself "What's the big deal? Any idiot could build one of those"? Well now is your chance to prove it. YourGreenDream.com has ideas and step-by-step procedures for building your own wind turbine, PV solar system, energy efficient LED systems and other cool stuff.

Friday, March 16, 2007

Al Gore's Tree Farm



Just for kicks, I did a little back-of-the-envelope calculation to see how many trees Al Gore would have to plant to offset his electric bill. Here are the results:

Each and every year, Al will have to plant 7656 trees over a plot of about 13 acres. These trees will swallow his massive 114 tons of carbon dioxide over the course of 100 years. But that's not all. This only covers his electricity consumption for one single home. It will not cover his home heating useage, extensive travel, manufacturing of his books & movies etc. His real footprint is much, much larger. He'd better get out the overalls and start digging!

Assumptions:
66-91 trees per metric tonne CO2 (Edinburgh Center for Carbon Management)
191,000 kilowatt hours used in 2006 (algore.com)
1.341 pound CO2 per KWh (EIA -- 1999, but close enough)

Wednesday, March 14, 2007

CT Energy Bills 2007

I figured I'd do a quick search to see what's on the legislative agenda for this year. Not too shabby. A lot of these are probably already dead, but I'll have to sort through to see what's still in the running.

***(Update 3/18/07) I noticed that a lot of the links below are screwy, though they weren't when I first posted this. Anyhow, you should get in the habit of doing your own energy legislation searches directly from the CT General Assembly website. They even have a bill-tracking feature so you can stay on top of the game by simply entering your favorite bills.

HB-5928.HTM AN ACT ENCOURAGING ENERGY CONSERVATION AND REDUCING ENERGY COSTS.
HB-7309.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PAY AS YOU SAVE AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY RECOMMENDATIONS.
HB-7310.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING OFF-PEAK ENERGY STORAGE.
HB-7098.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CONNECTICUT'S ENERGY FUTURE.
SB-1377.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY AND TECHNOLOGY.
SB-1375.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION AND THE STUDY AND DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INVESTMENTS.
SB-1374.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ELECTRICITY PROCUREMENT AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY.
HB-5934.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY, AND CONSERVATION, INCLUDING DEVELOPMENT OF SOLAR AND WIND POWER.
HB-7253.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY INVESTMENT.
HB-7097.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CONNECTICUT'S ENERGY POLICY.
HB-6209.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE RENEWABLE INVESTMENT FUND.
HB-6602.HTM AN ACT EXPANDING TRASH-TO-ENERGY FACILITIES.
HB-5930.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING LONG-TERM CAPACITY AND ENERGY CONTRACTS.
SB-0865.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN ENERGY INDEPENDENCE ECONOMIC PLAN.
SB-0864.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING STUDENT PREFERENCES FOR ENERGY.
HB-6203.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENT VEHICLES.
HB-5935.HTM AN ACT ALLOWING LONG-TERM ENERGY AND CAPACITY CONTRACTS.
HB-5017.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN EXEMPTION FROM THE SALES TAX FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT.
SB-0770.HTM AN ACT RESTORING FUNDS TO THE RENEWABLE ENERGY INVESTMENT FUND.
SB-0521.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A MUNICIPAL OPTION TO ABATE PROPERTY TAXES ON PROPERTY USED IN SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION.
SB-0520.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENT VEHICLES.
SB-0519.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A SALES TAX EXEMPTION FOR PROCESSES CONVERTING SOLAR ENERGY.
SB-0359.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING A DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY.
HB-6613.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING STATE ENERGY PLANNING.
HB-6612.HTM AN ACT CREATING A HOME ENERGY EFFICIENT SAVINGS MONTH.
HB-6607.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING LONG-TERM ENERGY AND CAPACITY CONTRACTS.
HB-6606.HTM AN ACT ENCOURAGING ENERGY EFFICIENT STREET AND SECURITY LIGHTING.
HB-6205.HTM AN ACT CREATING A SOLAR REQUIREMENT WITHIN THE RENEWABLE ENERGY PORTFOLIO STANDARDS.
HB-5936.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENT SCHOOLS AND STATE-FUNDED BUILDINGS.
HB-6407.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENCY MEASURES IN THE STATE BUILDING CODE.
HB-5361.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING USE OF THE SURPLUS FOR AN ENERGY TAX CREDIT.
SB-0518.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING THE PURCHASE OF ANY EQUIPMENT OR SERVICES IN RELATION TO A PROJECT FUNDED BY THE CONNECTICUT CLEAN ENERGY FUND
HB-6785.HTM AN ACT EXPANDING THE CLEAN ENERGY FUND'S SOLAR REBATE PROGRAM.
HB-5589.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING GRANTS TO NONPROFITS FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS.
HB-5295.HTM AN ACT INCREASING CLEAN AND RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION.
HB-5018.HTM AN ACT CREATING A DISTRIBUTIVE ENERGY GENERATION PROGRAM.
HB-6787.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ELECTRIC CONSUMPTION REDUCTION NOTICES.
HB-5016.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE INCLUSION OF THE COST OF RELOCATION IN ELECTRIC UTILITY RATES.
HB-5927.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CELLULAR TOWERS IN RESIDENTIAL ZONES.
SB-1422.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY RESOURCES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT.
HB-7332.HTM AN ACT EXTENDING SOLAR ENERGY TAX CREDITS.
HB-7232.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE LOW INCOME HEATING ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.
HB-7307.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SUSTAINABLE BIOMASS.
HB-7081.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CONNECTICUT'S ENERGY VISION.
HB-7080.HTM AN ACT CREATING A STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY.
SB-1332.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ON-SITE FUEL STORAGE.
SB-1331.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANIES.
HB-7223.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING BUSINESS AND ENERGY INDEPENDENCE DISTRICTS.
SB-0771.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY PROCUREMENT AND EFFICIENCY.
SB-0135.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING FUELS SOLD TO NONPROFIT HOSPITALS FROM THE GROSS EARNINGS TAX.
HB-6748.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENT SCHOOL AND MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS.
HB-6208.HTM AN ACT MODIFYING THE STATE'S ENERGY PROCUREMENT PROCESS.
HB-5921.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENT VEHICLES.
HB-5236.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN ENERGY USE TAX.
SB-0105.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY RELIEF FOR CONNECTICUT RATEPAYERS.
HB-6187.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING STATE ASSISTANCE TO SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR ENERGY COSTS.
HB-5133.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN EXTENSION OF THE PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION FOR SOLAR ENERGY ELECTRICITY GENERATING SYSTEMS.
HB-5014.HTM AN ACT CLASSIFYING BIODIESEL FUEL AS A CLASS I RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCE.
HB-7311.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING GEOTHERMAL HEAT SYSTEMS.
HB-7308.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING RESOURCE RECOVERY OUTPUT PURCHASE REQUIREMENTS AND INDIRECT COSTS AND REMEDIES FOR PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANIES.
SB-1330.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE.
SB-1329.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING BIODIESEL.
SB-1328.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITY CONTROL.
SB-1373.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ELECTRIC RATE RELIEF.
SB-1207.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SMALL-SCALE HYDROPOWER.
SB-1206.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING NATURAL GAS CUSTOMER CHOICE.
HB-7252.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE CONNECTICUT SITING COUNCIL.
HB-7183.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING WATER RESOURCE PLANNING.
HB-7251.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY AUDITS.
HB-6218.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE COST OF RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS.
SB-1376.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PAYMENT OF THE COSTS OF THE RELOCATION OF CERTAIN UTILITY FACILITIES.
SB-1327.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY BILL PAYMENT OPTIONS.
HB-7254.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ALTERNATIVE MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS.
SB-1263.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE CONSOLIDATION OF ENERGY CONSERVATION LOAN PROGRAM STATUTES.
SB-1209.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY MARKOUT TRAINING.
HB-6781.HTM AN ACT TO INCREASE FUNDING FOR THE CONSERVATION AND LOAD MANAGEMENT FUND.
HB-5933.HTM AN ACT RESTORING FUNDING TO THE CONSERVATION AND LOAD MANAGEMENT FUND.
SB-0980.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A MUNICIPAL OPTION TO ABATE PROPERTY TAXES ON HYBRID AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL PASSENGER VEHICLES.
SB-0104.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY BILL CONTRIBUTIONS.
SB-0018.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ALTERNATIVE FUEL SOURCES.
HB-6728.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION AND THE LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DESIGN CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS.
HB-6614.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING DISTRIBUTED RESOURCES.
HB-6414.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENERGY EFFICIENCY.
HB-5924.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SOLAR THERMAL INSTALLATIONS.
HB-5472.HTM AN ACT PROVIDING FUNDS FOR THE STUDY OF HYDROELECTRIC POWER IN WINDHAM.
HB-5470.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE SALES TAX EXEMPTION ON RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION PRODUCTS.
HB-6765.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING WATER METERS IN RENTAL UNITS.
SB-0618.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING DEMOLITION OF BUILDINGS.
SB-0985.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE.
HB-7377.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING GREEN BUILDINGS.
SB-0181.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE GASOLINE TAX.
SB-1381.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING APPROPRIATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENTS OF SOCIAL SERVICES AND AGRICULTURE.
HB-6206.HTM AN ACT REDUCING THE UTILITY COMPANIES TAX.
HB-7082.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN ELECTRIC CONSERVATION INCENTIVE PROGRAM.
SB-1137.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PRICE GOUGING.
HB-6207.HTM AN ACT REGULATING SHARED WASTEWATER FACILITIES.
HB-6778.HTM AN ACT PROTECTING PRIVATE PROPERTY ALONG UTILITIES' RIGHTS-OF-WAY.
HB-5468.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING AN EXCESS PROFITS REFUND TO ELECTRIC UTILITY RATEPAYERS.
HB-5316.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SALES TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR FUEL EFFICIENT MOTOR VEHICLES.
HB-5297.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING MUNICIPALITIES AND GOVERNMENT-ACCESS TELEVISION.
SB-1162.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PASSIVE SOLAR TECHNIQUES IN PLANNING AND ZONING REGULATIONS.
HB-5940.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AWARDS FOR CUSTOMER-SIDE DISTRIBUTED RESOURCES.
HB-5024.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PREPAID HOME HEATING OIL CONTRACTS.
HB-5942.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING PV AND SOLAR THERMAL HARDWARE SERVICES FROM THE SALES TAX.
HB-5941.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING A TAX CREDIT FOR THE RESIDENTIAL USE OF BIOHEAT.
HB-5932.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING TAX CREDITS FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION IN CONNECTICUT.
HB-5593.HTM AN ACT DEFINING BIODIESEL QUALITY STANDARDS AND INCLUDING BIODIESEL IN THE DEFINITION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS.
HB-5591.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN EXEMPTION FROM THE PETROLEUM PRODUCTS GROSS EARNINGS TAX FOR BIODIESEL FUEL.
HB-5590.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING BIODIESEL FUEL FROM THE MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS TAX.
HB-6810.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING RATEPAYER RELIEF AND LOCATIONAL LOAD REDUCTION SUPPORT.
HB-5296.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING A PUBLIC ELECTRICITY PROCUREMENT AUTHORITY.
SB-0925.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING RECENT ELECTRIC RATE INCREASES.
SB-0863.HTM AN ACT FACILITATING LONG-TERM PLANNING FOR UTILITIES.
SB-0512.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING MUNICIPAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY.
SB-0024.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING INCENTIVES FOR ALTERNATIVE FUEL OR FLEX FUEL VEHICLES.
SB-0017.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ONLINE OPERATION FUEL CONTRIBUTIONS.
HB-7013.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES.
HB-6784.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING INTERCONNECTION STANDARDS FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC AND ON-SITE GENERATION.
HB-6783.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING FUEL CELL MAINTENANCE.
HB-6782.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING LONG-TERM PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM CONTRACTS.
HB-6779.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UNDERGROUND UTILITY LINES.
HB-6611.HTM AN ACT PROMOTING FOSSIL FUEL CONSERVATION.
HB-6610.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE SOUTH END ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN PLANTSVILLE.
HB-6609.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY SUBSTATIONS AND TRANSMISSION FACILITIES.
HB-6605.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING UTILITY SERVICE TERMINATION.
HB-6603.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING PUBLIC UTILITY SHUT-OFF NOTICES.
HB-6601.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING TAXATION OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES.
HB-6600.HTM AN ACT REDUCING ELECTRICITY PRICES.
HB-6093.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SPEED LIMITS ON LIMITED ACCESS HIGHWAYS.
HB-5939.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A LOCAL OPTION TO PROVIDE A PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION FOR PV AND SOLAR THERMAL SYSTEMS.
HB-5938.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CABLE TELEVISION CONSUMER PROTECTION.
HB-5937.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN INCOME TAX CREDIT FOR THE PURCHASE OF COMPACT FLUORESCENT BULBS.
HB-5929.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING DECENTRALIZED POWER SYSTEMS.
HB-5471.HTM AN ACT PROVIDING FUNDING FOR MUNICIPAL ALTERNATIVE POWER GENERATION PROJECTS.
HB-5469.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING SENIOR CITIZENS' UTILITY BILLS.
HB-6847.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A SUSPENSION OF THE UTILITY COMPANIES TAX.
HB-6608.HTM AN ACT CREATING RATE RELIEF FOR CONNECTICUT'S RATEPAYERS.
HB-5926.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING TAX CREDITS FOR BIOHEAT.
HB-5925.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING AN INCOME TAX CREDIT FOR REPLACEMENT OF HOME HEATING SYSTEMS.
HB-5592.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING SCHOOL AND MUNICIPAL DIESEL FUEL USE FROM THE PETROLEUM PRODUCTS GROSS EARNINGS TAX.
HB-5467.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A SUSPENSION OF THE PETROLEUM PRODUCTS GROSS EARNINGS TAX.
HB-5359.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A REDUCTION IN THE UTILITIES COMPANIES TAX.
HB-5126.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE RATE OF THE GROSS RECEIPTS TAX ON PETROLEUM PRODUCTS.
HB-5020.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING RESIDENTIAL WINDMILLS.
SB-1021.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE GROSS RECEIPTS TAX ON GASOLINE ADDITIVES.
SB-0979.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A TAX ON TRANSMISSION SERVICES.
HB-6550.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING INEFFICIENT INCANDESCENT LAMPS.
HB-6848.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING A STATE POWER GENERATING AGENCY.
HB-5847.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING HEATING SYSTEM REPLACEMENT FOR MANSFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL.
HB-5588.HTM AN ACT EXEMPTING PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR INSTALLATIONS FROM THE SALES TAX.
SB-0240.HTM AN ACT PROHIBITING GASOLINE ZONE PRICING.
HB-5360.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING CONSERVATION AND LOAD MANAGEMENT.
HB-5294.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING ELECTRIC AGGREGATION.
SB-0025.HTM AN ACT REQUIRING STATE-OWNED VEHICLES TO RUN ON ALTERNATIVE FUEL.
HB-5217.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE SALES TAX EXEMPTION FOR RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION PRODUCTS.
HB-5023.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING WINDMILLS.
HB-5022.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING NEW POWER PLANTS.
HB-5021.HTM AN ACT CONCERNING THE ELECTRICITY INDUSTRY.
HB-5019.HTM AN ACT ESTABLISHING A DISTRIBUTED GENERATION TASK FORCE.